Selling Your Home? Here’s What Not to Display in Your Home Office

lighterside-staff-authorBy Lighter Side Staff  |  Read More

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With more people working from home than ever, the home office has become a major selling point to many potential buyers—and if you want to attract those potential buyers, you need to frame your office in a way that’s going to appeal to them.

And that includes getting rid of things that won’t appeal to them.

A recent article from Apartment Therapy outlined the items real estate agents recommend not displaying in your home office if you’re preparing to sell, including:

  • College degrees and other references to your alma mater. You may have nothing but happy memories about your university—but potential buyers might not feel the same way. For example, a potential buyer might have applied to your alma mater, only to be rejected—and seeing a diploma or a banner with the University logo in your home office could bring up those not-so-fond memories and take focus away from the property. Before you list your home, make sure to remove your diplomas and any other references to your alma mater from your home office.
  • Disorganized cords, papers, or clutter. You may feel comfortable working in a slightly disorganized space—but potential buyers may not feel the same way. Make sure to bundle the cords for your computer, monitor, and other electronics and clear your desk of any loose paper or clutter before you show your home.
  • Company swag. You might be tempted to keep your company swag (like a coffee mug or monitor sticker in your office)—but it’s best to keep where you work private. While it’s unlikely, if a deal goes south—and a potential buyer knows where you work—they could place a call into your company and say something disparaging to your employer.

The Takeaway:

Bottom line? When you’re selling your home, you want potential buyers to be able to picture themselves working comfortably from your home office—and that means removing personal effects and making sure things look organized.